The Pseudo-Christian Life II – The Extreme of Negligence
The Pseudo-Christian Life II – The Extreme of Negligence

The Pseudo-Christian Life II – The Extreme of Negligence

Unsurprisingly, this pseudo-Christianity I explored in the previous post presents itself on a dysfunctional spectrum. The materialistic extreme is the one already considered.
At the other extreme of this spectrum, there are Christians who have neglected their secular duties under the guise of Spiritual devotion.

In the Thessalonian Church, some Christians thought it unnecessary to commit themselves to their work and the apostle rebuked them firmly. Paul’s response is a reflection of what our disposition should be in our earthly endeavours.  The response has to do with believers having a means of livelihood, which would require their deliberate commitment to natural activities. The broader scope of things makes it clear that our spiritual devotion is not a reason for lack of diligence in our natural endeavours nor should it be seen as a means to earthly gains.

The biblical template for true christianity, as modelled by the patriarchs of the Christian Faith, is seen to be a life committed to christian service without neglecting earthly endeavours but rather as proof of it. Their devotion to God was a motivation to be diligent in their work and do so as unto the Lord. In other words, my natural commitments and endeavours will be seen in the light of my spiritual devotion.

The biblical template for Christianity is a life committed to christian service without neglecting earthly endeavours. My natural commitments and endeavours will be seen in the light of my spiritual devotion. Click To Tweet

Many believers have termed this view as “being balanced”. Some proponents of the view have unintentionally ended up creating a divide in the mind of believers. Consequently, we have Christians who now see their earthly pursuits as foreign to their spiritual devotion. This ought not to be.

In Eph 4:28, Paul instructs those who once stole to get involved in business to have enough for themselves and also to meet the need of fellow believers—this serves Christian piety.

 Let me paint this clearly: If giving is a sign of spiritual devotion, Paul, therefore, attaches my natural commitment (getting involved in a business) to my spiritual devotion (giving). From Paul’s perspective, my spiritual devotion is not an excuse for neglect in earthly endeavours, rather it should serve my spiritual devotion.

Paul also says something similar in 2 Thess 3:8-9. He reminds the Thessalonian Church of how he was labouring among them night and day, speaking of his natural commitments. Here, he sees his natural commitment as proof of his spiritual devotion, “…but to make ourselves an example for you to follow”. Therefore, being balanced as it were would not just mean the believer’s commitment to earthly pursuits and his spiritual devotion, it would mean earthly pursuits in the light of my spiritual devotion.

Paul attaches my natural commitment (getting involved in a business) to my spiritual devotion (giving). My spiritual devotion is not an excuse for neglect in earthly endeavours, rather it should serve my spiritual devotion. Click To Tweet

In Paul’s second epistle to the Church of God at Corinth, he says this: “For the love of Christ constraineth us; because we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead. And that he died for all, that they which live should not henceforth live unto themselves, but unto him which died for them, and rose again”. 

The book of Acts bears credence to Paul’s claim here. In the book of Acts, Paul the Apostle committed himself to the cause of the gospel despite his natural endeavours.  Paul is largely believed to be a tentmaker and also an apostle. Therefore, it is evident from Paul’s life and the evidence found in scripture, that I will be living the true Christian life if my focus for living is geared toward the cause of the gospel and not myself. The template of true Christianity is total devotion to the Christian despite one’s natural endeavours.

Therefore, we must not use our spiritual devotion as a cloak for slothfulness. God frowns on the slothful soul. We have a responsibility to serve humanity and steward creation properly through our natural endeavours as unto the Lord.

Spiritual devotion must not be used as a cloak for slothfulness. God frowns on the slothful soul. We have a responsibility to serve humanity and steward creation properly through our natural endeavours as unto the Lord. Click To Tweet
Faith is a medical doctor in training and a financial analyst. I’m passionate about seeing believers live the normal Christian life.
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